Buenos Aires Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

Kentucky Pizza

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Pizza Stones – Do you really need them?

It took us awhile, but we finally made it to Kentucky Pizza, one of the most famous pizzerias in the city. People seem to either love or hate this place. One acquaintance told us it was absolutely the worst pizza around. Meh, we don’t agree. But the main reason I wanted to go had nothing to do with pizza. My parents live in Kentucky, and I thought it would be funny to get a picture for them.

Kentucky Pizzeria

Kentucky is known for a lot of things: bluegrass music, horse racing, whiskey, tobacco fields. But pizza is not among them. I’m not sure why the founders chose the name “Kentucky” for their restaurant. Possibly, they hailed from the States, or it could have been an attempt to evoke the idea of the USA. Back in 1946 when Kentucky Pizza was established, the US was still the really cool country everyone else wanted to be!

Their logo is a racehorse, but it should be a fat man clutching his heart. Kentucky serves up classic Argentine pizza at its greasiest, cheesiest best. We ordered a fugazza and spinach pizzas, and left happy and full. Kentucky is famous for being open all night long, and is a favorite spot for hungry party kids looking for cheap drunk-food at 4am. But at any hour, if you’re looking for a good porteño-style pizza that’s easy on the wallet, don’t hesitate to go in.

Kentucky Pizza
Santa Fe, Av. 4602
The Art of Making Pizza

Location on our Buenos Aires Map
Tel: 4773-7869

Pizza Menu
Pizza Oven
Pizzeria Buenos Aires
Free Pizza
Kentucky Buenos Aires
Kentucky Pizza
Horse Whiskey
Kentucky Buenos Aires
Pizza Boys
Pizza Addiction
Pizza Buenos Aires
Fugazzetta
Classic Pizzeria
, , , , , , , , ,
May 3, 2011 at 9:33 pm Comment (1)

Las Cuartetas – Pizza in the Theater District

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

We’ve already written about El Cuartito, one of the very first pizza joints we discovered in Buenos Aires. Las Cuartetas is similar in food, name and decor. But it’s larger and, especially on a weekend night as the theaters of Calle Corrientes are emptying, much more boisterous.

Animated Pizza

We took friends from Germany on the same Thursday night that Plácido Domingo put on a free concert at the nearby obelisk. The restaurant was full when we arrived and, after the concert ended, the insanity in Las Cuartetas ascended to a level I could scarcely believe. Unceasing rivers of people flowed through the doors, passing by our table, headed towards the back in search of seating. I don’t know where any of them ended up; the restaurant was already packed to capacity when the flood started. The only explanation we could imagine was that they were exiting again through a door in the back, in an elaborate game to punk us. The line of people just kept filing past, like midget clowns piling into a car, and I swear I saw a few faces twice.

The pizza was incredible. Deep-dish, cheesy, greasy; everything we’ve come to expect of Buenos Aires’ best pizzerias. But really, the food took a back-seat to the atmosphere inside Las Cuartetas. Every seat was taken, and people shared tables with total strangers. Old deaf couples munching down fugazzas next to lip-pierced alterno-kids drinking Fanta, everyone screaming to be heard. Most of the screaming was directed at the waiter. The dapper old gentleman had to deal with about 40 tables in our section, and did so with the utmost professionalism.

We had a blast at Las Cuartetas, and can definitely recommend a visit, especially when it gets crowded. If the idea of cheesy, unhealthy pizza in a raucous madhouse full of shouting Argentines sounds like a good time, you won’t be disappointed.

Las Cuartetas
Corrientes, Av. 838
Location on our Buenos Aires Map
Books on Bar Notables

Pizza Zombies
Pizza Waiter
Buenos Aires Beer
Pizza in the Theaters
Hot Dad
Pizza Morron
Best Dulce de Leche
Serving Pizza
Pizza Stud
Pizza Pies
, , , , , , ,
April 24, 2011 at 4:14 pm Comments (5)

A Tour through Barracas

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Great Hostel in Buenos Aires

In the 19th century, the wealthiest corner of Buenos Aires wasn’t Retiro or Recoleta, but Barracas. Over the decades, this southern neighborhood lost its former glamor but recently has been showing signs of a resurgence in popularity.

Lsa Palmas
Yellow Fever

In 1871, a yellow fever epidemic devastated Buenos Aires. Eight percent of the city’s population fell to the disease, and the southern end of the city was particularly hard-hit. The upper-classes abandoned Barracas in droves, resettling in the north of the city and leaving the neighborhood to the European immigrants, still arriving from Italy and Spain by the boatload. The wealthy families generally held onto their properties as landlords, and slowly allowed them to fall into decay.

Las Palmas
Lsa Palmas

On a sunny Sunday afternoon, we set out to uncover the best the barrio has to offer. We stepped out of the bus at the strangely quiet Parque España, and made a beeline for Pizzería Las Palmas. Pizza was our first mission of the day, as it nearly always is. Las Palmas is a very cool, unpretentious restaurant with cheap prices and delicious food. With its neon lights and casual vibe, it felt like a place right out of 1950s Midwest America. I turned around every time I heard the door open, to check if the Fonz had just come in.

Calle Lanín
Calle Lanin

Full on cheese and grease, we headed south along Calle Brandsen, past a creepy neuropsychiatric hospital and onto Calle Lanín, a street which has been turned into an amazing open-air art gallery; kind of an answer to Boca’s Caminito. Every house on Lanín is covered with colored tiles, in swirling, mesmerizing patterns. The project, by local artist Marino Santa María, debuted over 10 years ago and has lost none of its brightness or vitality. And the amazing thing is, on a Sunday afternoon when thousands of tourists are crammed into El Caminito, Calle Lanín was absolutely desolate.

The Israeli Temple & Society of Light
Sociedad Luz

In fact, everything was so eerily quiet that we were becoming convinced that nobody actually lived in Barracas. But that changed upon crossing Avenida Montes de Oca, where the neighborhood burst noisily into life with shops, restaurants, dog poop, galleries, buses and traffic, and cleaning ladies dumping buckets of water out onto the sidewalk. As we wandered around Barracas’ eastern side, we came across some incredible buildings. A gorgeous Arabesque building on Calle Brandsen turned out, strangely, to be the Israeli Temple. According a group of older Jewish Argentinians standing outside, it has an amazing interior patio (the temple was unfortunately closed when we arrived). Nearby, we found the neoclassical Sociedad Luz building, a stronghold of 19th-century socialists who founded the university to promote scientific learning among the working classes. Today, the building continues its educative purpose as a public library.

Iglesia de Santa Felicitas
Angel

But Barracas’ most impressive building is the Iglesia de Santa Felicitas. This massive religious complex was inaugurated in 1876, and named in honor of Felicitas Guerrero, who enjoyed fame as the most beautiful noblewoman in Buenos Aires. As a teenager, she had been married off to a rich and much-older landowner, who died soon after the union, leaving his young widow incredibly rich. Felicitas had youth, wealth and beauty… it’s no surprise that she became the desire of numerous suitors, among them Enrique Ocampo, who had been obsessed with her for years. When he learned that she’d fallen for a rival, Ocampo lost it. Following her onto her estate in Barracas, he confronted her with a pistol. “You’ll marry me, or you’ll marry no one!” When she tried to escape, he shot her in the back then committed suicide. (Or was shot by Felicitas’ father, who had quickly arrived on the scene; it’s never been satisfactorily resolved). Both the widow and her assassin were buried in Recoleta Cemetery on the same day.

Barracas was once the scene of the noble class’s exploits, but has spent the last century as a forgotten corner left to poor workers. The richness of its history is evident in every corner, and it’s a fascinating neighborhood in which to spend a day. Warned off by overly cautious guidebooks and well-meaning locals, tourists generally avoid the area, and that’s a shame. Barracas has a lot to offer… but get there quick if you want to be ahead of the curve, because the neighborhood is already at work shaking off its rough image. Check out the rest of our images, of this incredible and still relatively unknown section of the city.

Calle Lanín on our Buenos Aires Map
Short Term Stay in Buenos Aires

Best Pizza
Sleep Driver
Dog
Old Timer
Old Car
Mental Hospital
Barracas
Marino-Santa-Maria
Fake Porteño
Tiles Buenos Aires
Architecture Buenos Aires
Argentina Colors
Volkswagen Buenos Aires
Salvation Army Buenos Aires
Shopping Buenos Aires
Barracas Buenos Aires
Jewish Culture Buenos Aires
Jewish Temple Buenos Aires
Temple Barracas
Iglesia-de-Santa-Felicitas
Iglesia Barracas
Buenos Aires
1970 Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires Blog
, , , , ,
March 22, 2011 at 6:20 pm Comment (1)

Vesre: The Crazy Reverse-Talk of Buenos Aires

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Spanish Learning Tools

“Revés” is Spanish for reverse and, if you say its syllables in reverse, you get vesre: a strange little word game that has worked its way into the normal speech of Buenos Aires.

Vesre

Pizza becomes zapi. Café is feca. Baño is ñoba. Theoretically, you could do this with any word, but a lot of the combinations have become so widely-used, that porteños often don’t even know they’re doing it. And the “vesred” words can take on a slightly different connotation: Hotel = a hotel, but telo = a hotel for sex. Mujer = woman, while jermu = wife. You don’t take your jermu to a telo.

As might be expected, vesre isn’t considered proper Spanish, and not used in formal settings at all. It’s street language, and popular in tango lyrics. In the 1926 tango ¿Qué querés con eses loro? (What Do You Want from That Hag?), the singer tells her ex-boyfriend that his new girlfriend has the profile of a “llobaca”. Llobaca = caballo = horse.

Fun! But I think I’d better concentrate on my regular Spanish, before attempting to say anything in vesre.

, , , ,
March 3, 2011 at 1:15 pm Comments (7)

The Santa Rosa de Lima Basilica and Southern Balvanera

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Start Drinking Mate!

Before we began our exploration of Once, we spent some time walking around the southern end of Balvanera, and happened upon the Basilica Santa Rosa de Lima, on Avenido Belgrano. Built in the Roman-Byzantine style in 1926, this church is most impressive for its mammoth cupola. Santa Rosa was a Peruvian catholic from the 16th century, who would become South America’s first saint. She died a virgin at the age of 31, after having predicted the exact date of her death.

The basilica was the most dramatic building we saw in southern Balvanera, but we had a great time walking around this rather un-touristy section of the city. It’s the kind of place where you can get a massive salami sandwich for pocket change, and where English is nowhere to be heard. Enjoy the pictures!

Santa Rosa de Lima Basilica on our Buenos Aires Map
Hostels in Buenos Aires

Basilica-Santa-Rosa-de-Lima
Awesome Church Buenos Aires
Dome Buenos Aires
Religion Buenos Aires
Peace Dove
Reflection of a Church
Stained Glass Buenos Aires
Santa Maria
Maria Balvanera
Columns
Massive Church
Yellow House Buenos Aires
Cage House Buenos Aires
Sado Maso Buenos Aires
Coto Buenos Aires
El-Encuentro-Pizzeria
German House Buenos Aires
Lucky Shoe
NYC Buenos Aires
O Buenos Aires
On The Menu
Pink House Buenos Aires
Weird Cross
Bar Carlitos
Bar Balvanera
Salami Snack
, , , , , , , , ,
March 2, 2011 at 4:06 pm Comments (0)

Pedro Telmo – Good Cooking in San Telmo

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Great Pizza Recipes

We’ve been eating out a lot since we arrived, mainly at places which have come highly recommended by guidebooks or locals. Great parrillas, Peruvian cuisine, famous pizzerias. But that doesn’t mean we’re skipping the less well-known places entirely! This past week, after a long day of exploring the city, we sat down inside Pedro Telmo, on the western side of the San Telmo Market.

Madres Argenina

We ordered a couple empanadas, which were delicious, and also enjoyed their heartier meals, such as home-cooked lasagna and pizzas. With posters of Carlos Gardel and soccer teams on the walls, and wonderfully sweet ladies working both behind and in front of the bar, Pedro Telmo is the down-to-earth kind of establishment that abounds in Buenos Aires.

What’s your favorite neighborhood joint to get a quick bite, or take a short break?

Pedro Telmo on our Buenos Aires Map
Short Term Loft Rental in Buenos Aires

Pedro San Telmo
Cute Restaurant Buenos Aires
Charilie Chaplin Buenos Aires
Barrio San Telmo
San Telmo Kitchen
Medialunas
Horno San Telmo
Empanadas Fresca
Empanadas Pedro San Telmo
, , , , , , , , , , ,
February 20, 2011 at 4:50 pm Comments (3)

El Cuartito – Pizza & Empanadas

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

The Art of Making Pizza

Step into a time warp and a grab a table at El Cuartito: one of Buenos Aires’ oldest and most popular pizzerias. With vintage boxing and football posters covering the walls, a frantic waiter running around the tables to take orders and deliver food, and the most delicious pizza I’ve eaten in quite some time, this incredible restaurant is one of the city’s best.

Pizza Waiter

El Cuartito has been in business since 1934. Found in Recoleta, it’s a busy place during lunch; you can either order at the counter or sit down for service. Well you’ll get service if you can grab the waiter, which isn’t so easy. And once you do get his attention, don’t expect him to patiently answer all the questions you may have about the menu. While taking our order, he didn’t even pause at our table, just slowed down his pace a bit as he passed by.

The prices at El Cuartito are great and the pizza is out of this world. At least, it is if you like cheese, mounds of heavy cheese dripping off every slice. A lot of people might turn their noses up at this style of pie, but I was in heaven. We ordered the medium size (“chico”), which came with six slices. You can combine different styles of pizza, and try out a variety; we went with the Atómica and the Cuartito. The empanadas are another house specialty, and we got one filled with spicy beef. We noticed that a lot of locals were skipping on pizza entirely and had a meal of two or three empanadas.

Dessert was a silly idea. My stomach was already full to the breaking point, but when we saw the dish served to a guy at a nearby table, we couldn’t resist. “Eso! Lo quiero también!” I shouted at the waiter as he zipped by. Minutes later a rich portion of flan, with a side of sweet, carmelly dulce de leche was set in front of us.

El Cuartito instantly vaulted itself onto my list of favorite places, and I would have to return. But there were so many other pizzerias to try! Suffice to say, weight maintenance was a constant struggle during our time in Buenos Aires. If you’ve got some restaurant tips, leave a comment or let us know!

Location on our Buenos Aires Map

Pizza Sign
Pizza BA Cuartito
El Cuartito Pizza
Empanadas Argentina
Pizza Oven
Pizza Pizza
Pizzaria Buenos Aires
Awesome Pizza
Beer Bar
Pizza and Beer
Pizza Spices
Empanadas Buenos Aires
Pizza Buenos Aires
Flan Leche de Dulce
El Cuartito
Pizza Guy

Pizza in Asturias

, , , , , ,
February 9, 2011 at 11:09 pm Comments (14)
Kentucky Pizza
For 91 Days