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Vesre: The Crazy Reverse-Talk of Buenos Aires

Spanish Learning Tools

“Revés” is Spanish for reverse and, if you say its syllables in reverse, you get vesre: a strange little word game that has worked its way into the normal speech of Buenos Aires.

Vesre

Pizza becomes zapi. Café is feca. Baño is ñoba. Theoretically, you could do this with any word, but a lot of the combinations have become so widely-used, that porteños often don’t even know they’re doing it. And the “vesred” words can take on a slightly different connotation: Hotel = a hotel, but telo = a hotel for sex. Mujer = woman, while jermu = wife. You don’t take your jermu to a telo.

As might be expected, vesre isn’t considered proper Spanish, and not used in formal settings at all. It’s street language, and popular in tango lyrics. In the 1926 tango ¿Qué querés con eses loro? (What Do You Want from That Hag?), the singer tells her ex-boyfriend that his new girlfriend has the profile of a “llobaca”. Llobaca = caballo = horse.

Fun! But I think I’d better concentrate on my regular Spanish, before attempting to say anything in vesre.

- Short Term Apartments in Buenos Aires

San Telmo Hostels
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March 3, 2011 at 1:15 pm Comments (7)

The Santa Rosa de Lima Basilica and Southern Balvanera

Start Drinking Mate!

Before we began our exploration of Once, we spent some time walking around the southern end of Balvanera, and happened upon the Basilica Santa Rosa de Lima, on Avenido Belgrano. Built in the Roman-Byzantine style in 1926, this church is most impressive for its mammoth cupola. Santa Rosa was a Peruvian catholic from the 16th century, who would become South America’s first saint. She died a virgin at the age of 31, after having predicted the exact date of her death.

The basilica was the most dramatic building we saw in southern Balvanera, but we had a great time walking around this rather un-touristy section of the city. It’s the kind of place where you can get a massive salami sandwich for pocket change, and where English is nowhere to be heard. Enjoy the pictures!

Santa Rosa de Lima Basilica on our Buenos Aires Map
-Hostels in Buenos Aires

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Buenos Aires Secret Books
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March 2, 2011 at 4:06 pm Comments (0)

Pedro Telmo – Good Cooking in San Telmo

Great Pizza Recipes

We’ve been eating out a lot since we arrived, mainly at places which have come highly recommended by guidebooks or locals. Great parrillas, Peruvian cuisine, famous pizzerias. But that doesn’t mean we’re skipping the less well-known places entirely! This past week, after a long day of exploring the city, we sat down inside Pedro Telmo, on the western side of the San Telmo Market.

Madres Argenina

We ordered a couple empanadas, which were delicious, and also enjoyed their heartier meals, such as home-cooked lasagna and pizzas. With posters of Carlos Gardel and soccer teams on the walls, and wonderfully sweet ladies working both behind and in front of the bar, Pedro Telmo is the down-to-earth kind of establishment that abounds in Buenos Aires.

What’s your favorite neighborhood joint to get a quick bite, or take a short break?

Pedro Telmo on our Buenos Aires Map
-Short Term Loft Rental in Buenos Aires

Pedro San Telmo
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Empanadas Pedro San Telmo
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February 20, 2011 at 4:50 pm Comments (3)

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