Buenos Aires Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

La Poesía – A Great Place to Read, Drink and Relax

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Classic: Read some Borges at La Poesía

With its shelves stacked with books, soda bottles and photographs from years past, La Poesía is a bar beautiful enough to truly deserve its name.

La Poesia

The café was originally opened in 1982, to celebrate the end of the military dictatorship and provide a place for Buenos Aires’ intellectuals, authors and poets to congregate and discuss their renascent democracy. It was immediately popular, especially known for its sessions of Poesía Lunfarda, but the bar was closed after just six years. In 2008, the same couple who own Bar Federal restored the Poseía to life and helped reestablish it as a staple of the San Telmo scene.

I was in the place all the time, usually with a book. It has an atmosphere conducive to reading, with tango music playing softly in the background and a good selection of drinks. Unfortunately, the wait staff isn’t always the friendliest. One girl in particular always greeted my arrival with a frown and an attitude; I couldn’t for the life of me figure out what I’d done to her. And once, a waitress directed me to a table with a power outlet, watched me set up my computer, provided me with the Wifi code, then took my order. The internet didn’t work and when I pointed that out, she was like, “Yeah. It’s been out all day”. But, couldn’t you tell I wanted to use it? I even asked you for the access key! “Yeah. Well, you never asked me if the internet worked“.

Regardless of the occasionally brusque service, there’s plenty to enjoy at La Poesía. Leave your computer at home, and take a book. A book of poetry, if you must.

La Poesía
Chile 502
Location on our Buenos Aires Map
Coffee Culture

Bar Notable
Books Poesia
Cans
Cooking Cook
Facturas Buenos Aires
Salami Buenos Aires
Side Eye
Malinesa Sandwich Poesia
Cafe Con Leche
Hotels San Telmo
, , , , , , ,
May 3, 2011 at 8:48 pm Comments (2)

Yrurtia’s Canto al Trabajo

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Oviedo Blog

I’ll remember Roger Yrurtia for two things. One: for having a last name so ridiculously intimidating that I won’t even try to pronounce it. And, two: for his gorgeous sculpture called Canto al Trabajo (“Song to Work”).

Canto Al Trabajo

This statue, in the middle of a little tree-filled park between the lanes of Paseo Colón, is a stirring tribute to the spirit of industry. Commissioned in 1905, it shows a diverse swath of people pulling a massive stone along the ground — children, women, men; Argentina.

Argentina has had a troubled history, and the bulk of its problems came after this sculpture was created. In his homage to the working class, Yrurtia seems to have foreseen the spirit of cooperation and perseverance that normal Argentines would soon need to exhibit.

Location on our Buenos Aires Map
Hostel Hotel Map Buenos Aires

Canto Al Trabajo Buenos Aires
Yrurtia
Mafalda San Telmo
, , , ,
April 28, 2011 at 9:53 pm Comment (1)

The National History Museum & Lezama Park

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Sign up for our free Newsletter

The biggest park in San Telmo is Lezama, a giant green hill which fills up on weekends with sun-bathers, mate drinkers and chess players, along with some market stands. The park also is home to the Museo Histórico Nacional.

Pedro De Mendoza

Eager to deepen our understanding of Argentine history, we visited the museum on one of our first days in Buenos Aires. It’s small. We were done in less than 20 minutes and didn’t learn much about Argentina’s history. I was expecting a primer in the country’s story, exhibits about the key points in Argentina’s development, but it was nothing like that.

That’s not to say it was a disappointment. At one peso, the museum is basically free and boasts some extraordinary pieces of art, including giant canvasses of Argentina’s revolutionary army, and portraits of its presidents. The collection of artwork and objects might resonate more with Argentinians already familiar with the stories, than with foreigners.

Parque Lezama itself is awash in history. It’s here that Pedro de Mendoza founded the city, way back in 1536, and the explorer is honored in the park with an impressive monument. Today, Lezama is a typically porteño mix of beauty and destitution. The colorful amphitheater on the park’s northern side serves mainly as a clubhouse/bathroom/shelter for homeless people, and a lovely path lined with statues is kept strictly protected bars.

Sunny weekends are the time to visit Lezama. Bring a blanket, your matecito, and (if you really want to emulate porteños) somebody to make out with, and enjoy one of the coolest chill-out spots in the city.

Location of Parque Lezama on our BA Map
Everything you need to book your vacation

Lezama Park
Museo Historico Buenos Aires
Lion San Telmo
Lezama Mueseum
Bells Buenos Aires
Crazy Bird
Lezama
Protected
Naked Lady Run
Romulus-and-Remus
Sol Buenos Aires
, , , , ,
April 26, 2011 at 9:52 pm Comments (0)

San Telmo’s Market Hall

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Buenos Aires Map

Occupying a good chunk of the block sketched out by Estados Unidos, Defensa, Carlos Calvo and Bolivar, the Mercado de San Telmo is a place which locals and tourists visit in almost equal numbers. The latter to buy antiques and souvenirs, the former for their day-to-day groceries.

Telmo Dome

Since we precariously straddle the line between tourist and local, we use the mercado for both purposes. A number of veggie and meat stands compete for business in the center of the market, surrounded by antique shops that extend down long hallways. Prices for cool souvenirs, second-hand clothing and random trinkets are noticeably cheaper than at the Sunday antiques market. I picked up an old Carlos Gardel album for twelve pesos, and on that very day, saw the same album being sold for 60 outside.

The souvenir shops are a somewhat newer addition, capitalizing on San Telmo’s reputation as the best antiques hunting ground in the city, but the market has a history stretching back to 1897. It was inaugurated a couple decades after the Yellow Fever epidemic which devastated San Telmo, and the new center of commerce was greeted enthusiastically by residents. Ever since, the mercado has been an integral part of the neighborhood. In 2001, it was even declared a national historic monument.

When you go, take your wallet and take your time. It’s almost inconceivable that you’ll walk out without buying something. If you’re in the mood for meat, check out our favorite stand: Puesto 54. With incredible prices and friendly cleaver-wielding butchers always willing to explain the various cuts, it quickly became our go-to place for beef.

Mercado de San Telmo
Location on our Buenos Aires Map
Buenos Aires Travel Guides

Shopping Buenos Aires
Mercado San Telmo
Butcher Buenos Aires
Cuts of Meat Argentina
Chorrizo Buenos Aires
Butcher
Antiques
Antiques Buenos Aires
Sombreros Buenos Aires
, , , , , , , , , , ,
April 25, 2011 at 10:33 pm Comments (4)

Buenos Aires – A World Unto Itself

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

The Music of Carlos Gardel

Russian Nights

There’s no reason to leave Buenos Aires to experience the different cultures of the world. So many people and cultures from all around the globe have established a strong presence here… the Bolivian neighborhoods of Liniers, Chinatown in Belgrano, the Italian heritage in La Boca, and Once with its Jewish population are just some of them. There’s even a Valencian community which celebrates Fallas in Buenos Aires!

Hope you get a kick out of these diverse photos from Buenos Aires:

San Telmo Market
Cartas
Bus Buenos Aires
Defense Buenos Aires
Pigeon Monument
Buenos Aires Cat
Dog San Telmo
Secret La Boca
Souvenirs Buenos Aires
Spider Spider
Porteño
San Telmo
BsAs
Buenos Aires Traffic
Pink Bridge
Parked In
Sneaky
Colors of La Boca
Gaucho Dance
Power Tower
Scraping Skies
Moulin Rouge San Telmo
Moody
Lost in Translation
Eating Buenos Aires
Bar Sur
, , , , ,
April 25, 2011 at 3:31 pm Comment (1)

The Reserva Ecológica Costanera Sur

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Cheap Flights to Buenos Aires

A green oasis on the eastern end of the big city, the ecological reserve of the Costanera Sur offers an escape from the humdrum of daily life. Walking along of the reserve’s paths, through wild growing pampas grass, it’s difficult to believe that this is still Buenos Aires.

Buenos Aires

The Reserva Ecológica feels like an untamed area that’s always been a part of the landscape, but nothing could be further from the truth. This terrain didn’t even exist until the 1970s, when the city decided to “reclaim” land from the river for development, following a procedure learned from the Dutch. The project was abandoned after progress had already begun and, soon enough, plants and animals had moved onto the rich sediment. Where the Rio de la Plata had flowed throughout history, humanity had inadvertently built a home for a richly diverse wildlife. Usually works the other way around.

The city wasted no time in declaring the region an “Ecological Reserve”, and the new park quickly became popular among bird watchers, joggers, and those looking for a break from the stress of Buenos Aires. At over 860 acres, with many kilometers worth of track, a comprehensive tour of the park can take hours. There’s a lot to see; besides the wildlife, the magnificent skyline of Puerto Madero looms in the background. Walk far enough and you’ll reach the river, vast and gray. But for the cargo ships floating in the distance, it could be the world’s biggest puddle.

We make use of the Reserva constantly for jogging, and almost always encounter something new. On my last visit, a huge monitor lizard scuttled across the path in front of me. Jürgen has found turtles. We’ve also taken a bike trip through the park, which is recommendable. But regardless of how you move through the Costanera, you’re bound to have an interesting time.

Reserva Ecológica Costanera Sur
Northern Entrance on our BA Map
Southern Entrance on our BA Map
La Bicicleta Naranja’s Website
Location of La Bicicleta Naranja

Orange Bike Buenos Aires
Butterfly
Contrast Buenos Aires
Jogging Buenos Aires
Fly To Buenos Aires
Naked Buenos Aires
Nature Buenos Aires
Nature Fabric
Summer Buenos Aires
Sneaky Bird
Crazy Bird
Dry Field
Sailing Buenos Aires
, , , , , , , , ,
April 22, 2011 at 12:18 am Comments (3)

The Depto: A Temporary Home Away from Home

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

We wrote about the San Telmo Loft in a previous post, but we also wanted to highlight another apartment which Angela and John offer, for vacations or short term rentals. The Depto, on Calle Defensa.

Wohnung Buenos Aires

This place has one of the best locations in Buenos Aires: Defensa, in between Calle Chile and Independencia. It’s a great street, the home of the Sunday San Telmo Fair, and no more than a 10 minute walk from the Plaza de Mayo. Calle Defensa can be raucous, but the apartment is set way back in a huge complex, so you don’t get any street noise at all.

Best of all, the Depto is beautifully outfitted, with stylish furniture and wallpaper. High-speed internet, a fully-equipped kitchen, desks, DVD player… it’s the kind of temporary residence you can instantly feel at home in. Check out the pictures, and if you’re interested, get in touch with Angela and John to ask about availability.

San Telmo Loft’s Depto
Location on our Buenos Aires Map
More Buenos Aires Accommadation

Rent Buenos Aires
Apartment San Telmo
, , , , ,
April 11, 2011 at 11:35 pm Comments (5)

San Telmo’s Sunday Antiques Market

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

How to Buy and Sell Antiques

On any day of the week, San Telmo is the best spot in Buenos Aires to go antiques-hunting. Dealers hawk everything from chandeliers to ancient books in shops which blanket the neighborhood. But the Sunday antiques market in Plaza Dorrego has become a phenomenon; all San Telmo comes out to party along with thousands of visitors in a celebration of curbside capitalism.

San Telmo Market Fair

Walking around the antique vendors’ stalls in Plaza Dorrego is a treat, even if you’re not planning on purchasing anything. Old soda bottles, copper cookware, matecitos, vintage telephones and collector matchboxes are just some of the treasures on offer. The prices are fairly high, but the quality is top-notch. Because there are more antique dealers in San Telmo than stalls at the market, a weekly lottery determines who gets the right to set up shop. Organizers are strict about their rules, which dictate that all actually be antiques, and that the owners be physically present at the stands.

The antique dealers are confined to the plaza, but shopping continues for at least six blocks down Calle Defensa, where artisans and craft-workers hock on the curb to sell their wares. We’ve found a number of great gifts here, including a hand-crafted teddy bear for a niece and individually designed t-shirts. And the prices are so good, you’d feel guilty about haggling. Tango bands play on the corners, and everyone’s hanging out and talking, drinking mate and bumping into friends.

Proceedings become more festive as the sun goes down and a group of bongo-drummers begins to parade up and down Defensa, encouraging onlookers to join in. I must not have any Brazilian blood in me, because I’ll never understand the whole bongo thing. Anyone can play bongo drums, and sound somewhat competent. You don’t actually need dreadlocks. But it doesn’t matter that bongos are relatively ridiculous, because man do the girls love them! Once those rhythms start, control goes out the window. So, guys, if you really want to impress the ladies, forget nice clothes and expensive cologne. Just grab a bongo drum, skip the shower, and throw on a ratty Bob Marley t-shirt.

Meters from the makeshift parade, a popular milonga gets underway around 9pm in the plaza. With great music and an ample floor filled with dancers of all skill levels, it’s the perfect place to show off your tango moves.

Plaza Dorrego on our Buenos Aires Map
Great Hostels in Buenos Aires

Soda Bottles
House Numbers
Pink Phone
Pink Silver
Angel San Telmo
Antique Market
Hang Girl
Argentina Pharmacy
Argentinian Bull
Bombillas
Boxing Gloves
COCK Fight
Foxes
Match Boxes
Pillow Angel
Pots and Pans
Sugar Spoon
Watches
Wooden Shoe
Tango San Telmo
, , , , , , , , ,
March 17, 2011 at 1:20 pm Comments (6)

Lunch at Caseros, Another Wonderful Find in San Telmo

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Our Travel Insurance: World Nomads

San Telmo is at no loss for great restaurants, and we recently stumbled upon another: Caseros, on the street of the same name, near Parque Lezama.

Lunch Buenos Aires

The restaurant is almost clinically white. While choosing our table, we noticed that even most of the guests were dressed in white. But a feeling of warmth reigns in Caseros, and we immediately felt at home. The walls of the bar and kitchen were painted to resemble a ramshackle storefront from decades ago, and baskets full of eggplants and fruit were set on each table. The light color scheme and huge windows allowing in the sun made for a cheerful place to have a meal.

The menu is small, which is something I always appreciate, and our food was excellent. I chose the fish, and Jürgen had an incredible plate of beef, served with chunks of onion, pumpkin and potato. The portions were generous, and we loved every bite. Caseros is famous for its lemonade so, even though it makes an odd dessert, we finished our meal with a glass. Freshly squeezed, and served with mint leaves. Excellent.

We went to Caseros on a rainy, mid-week afternoon, and it was packed. I asked the waiter if it was always so popular, and he responded in the affirmative. Little wonder: with friendly service, great food, good prices and a quiet location next to the park, Caseros is tough to beat for a relaxed lunch in San Telmo.

Caseros
Caseros 486
Tel: 4307-4729
Location on our Buenos Aires Map
Pasta Recipe

Caseros
Veggie Buenos Aires
Restaurant San Telmo
Thinking About Wine
Making Lemonade
Home Made Lemonade
Waiter Buenos Aires
Butter
Enselada Buenos Aires
Great Restaurant Buenos Aires
Pescado Argentina
Perfect Steak
Cafe Solo
, , , , , ,
March 13, 2011 at 6:42 pm Comments (6)

Taking the Bus Home at Night

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

91 Days in Savannah, USA

Bus Call

Our favorite mode of transportation in Buenos Aires is the bus. But we already mentioned that. This weekend, we took a late ride home on the #64, after an evening exploring Palermo Soho. I started taking pictures out the window, to make the time pass faster… and man, did that work! BsAs is interesting enough by day, but at night the city gets even stranger and more wonderful. The following pictures were all taken during that one bus ride home.

Buenos Aires Rough Guide

Bus Curtain
Bizarre Buenos Aire
Biking Buenos Aires
Bachelorette Party
Dude
Face of Buenos Aires
Bus
Ice Cream Buenos Aires
Kiosk
Nail Work Buenos Aires
NIght Life Buenos Aires
Taxi Buenos Aires
Pedistrians Buenos Aires
Walking Home
Waiting For The Bus
Trash Picker
, , , , , , , , , , , ,
February 27, 2011 at 9:14 pm Comments (2)

« Older Posts

La Poesa - A Great Place to Read, Drink and Relax
For 91 Days